Dyscravia

Source: This Article has been Edited for Accessibility Dyscravia is a voicing substitution dysgraphia, i.e. a type of writing disorder in which the affected person confuses letters denoting sounds that differ in their voicing attribute (e.g. writing “dap” instead of “tap” or “tash” instead of “dash”). It arises from a deficit within the phoneme-to-grapheme conversion process in a cognitive function specialized in the conversion of the voicing feature of […]

Deciphering Dyslexia: The Paradox of the Differently-Wired Brain

By Daria Costello Dyslexia has long been a generic term, even a terminological catch-all, encompassing a range of classifications, symptoms, and diagnoses. It’s remarkable how much disparity there is in understanding dyslexia and its causes and treatments, despite having been first identified and labeled by doctors in Europe over a century ago.[i] Generally recognized at its […]

Center for Research, Evaluation and Awareness of Dyslexia

Source: This Article has been Edited for Accessibility The Center for Research, Evaluation and Awareness of Dyslexia (Center for READing) is a university-based program at Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas. It was established in 1996 to: develop strategies for the prevention and remediation of reading disabilities search for strategies that will lead to the improvement of remedial processes provide […]

All about writing disabilities and dysgraphia: The truth about scrawling and scribbling

Humankind underwent an unimaginable transformation in the last millennium. The Science Museum of London, England estimates that we communicated using language as much as 100,000 years ago. Historians posit that prior to the development of language, humans communicated through writing. Yet, many brilliant people over the centuries with dysgraphia and writing disabilities prospered, succeeded, and showed […]

Monotropism

Source: This Article has been Edited for Accessibility Monotropism, a typical feature of autism, is when an individual has a restricted range of interests and can only pay attention to what is in his or her attention tunnel. This hypothesis was published in 2005 and was developed by Dinah Murray, a Doctor of Philosophy; Mike Lesser, a mathematician; […]